When most people think of technology, they think of Silicon Valley, Stanford and legions of brogrammers. It’s quite specific, simultaneously a monolith and monoculture. What people don’t think of are the smaller, specialized loci popping up around the country, the Kansas Cities and Detroits out there that are worthy and in need of just a little water, fertilizer and sunlight. The events group Techweek, which lands in New York today, exists to be this catalyzing force, and it’s led by a woman only three years out of a midwestern university. Now, less than a year into her CEO role, she has a plan to expand into the wild world of digital media. Everyone, this is Amanda Signorelli.

In practice, content recommendation is difficult to get right (as you’ve probably noticed while scrolling through countless “recommended for you” duds on streaming video providers). There are so many subtleties baked into a good movie or TV show that extend beyond blunt user behavior profiles. Maybe this is why it took an empathically minded French film fan, rather than an engineer, to solve the problem of good recommendation and bring it into the realm of 2.0.

New York–based software company Kaltura recently made headlines when it received a $50 million investment from Goldman Sachs. But it wasn’t Kaltura’s first large backing from an outside investor. Since its founding in 2006, the company has had a total of three big funding rounds totaling $110 million. Why are so many betting big on what appears to be just another video delivery company?

Accedo CEO and cofounder Michael Lantz is most comfortable when he’s exploring the outer edge of the video experience. Back in 2004, he and partner Fredrik Andersson, SVP of business development, scanned the horizon of emerging internet TV technology and saw an opportunity to challenge the existing market. They came up with Accedo, a video solutions service that would usher in the next generation of the TV experience. In the 12 years since, Accedo has built a list of first-class customers including Netflix, Fox, Sky, Roku, Discovery and Disney.

In a world where everyone claims to be a visionary innovator of disruptive technologies, Ray DeRenzo has in fact been there from the beginning. A die-hard San Franciscan and Golden State Warriors fan (before it was cool), DeRenzo came up through mobile, creating SMS solutions with Vodafone (before people knew what a text was) and mobile video with MobiTV (before people could conceive of streaming).